3 Things Your Students Need Coming Back From Break

Written By: Lindsay Norlin

Coming back to the classroom after two weeks off is often times not only difficult for students, but teachers as well. It's important that we all take a day to ease back into the swing of things and also gauge the well-being of our students. As we all know, the holidays can be a joyous time for some, but for others it can be a source of stress and instability. Here are three things you can do that first week back to check-in on your students, build community and remind them of your expectations.

1. Temperature Check - It is important to check-in with students to see where they are at coming back from break. In secondary classrooms this can be tough provided the amount of students a teacher has and the difficulty it might be for some students to share what is going on publicly for all to hear. Here is a simple google survey you can replicate that is a quick, but effective way to do a temperature check on all students that allows them the privacy to share with you individually. Feel free to make a copy and use it with your own students. We have seen teachers use check-in tools like this on a weekly basis, which over time allows students to feel more and more comfortable to share what is going on outside of the classroom. This allows teachers the opportunity to connect individually and show interest in their current situation or provide support if needed. It can take the guessing game out of teaching when a kid has their head down or seems uninterested in the lesson. It can also provide opportunities to build relationships with your students on things they share through the survey.

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2. Revisit Expectations - It is our belief that ALL people need to be reminded more than they need to be taught. As a teacher, I often needed to be reminded of my copy code in January and what lunch I had on late start Wednesdays. Our students need these reminders as well. Coming back from break is a great time to remind students what the expectations are in your classroom surrounding daily procedures like cell phone use, when to use the pencil sharpener and how to transition from one activity to another. It helps to actually give students scenarios and let them physically practice it. Add some humor by allowing kids to demonstrate the wrong way to do things, just don't forget to model the correct way as well! Remember, that besides your normal classroom expectations, what kind of expectations do you have around building relationships inside and outside your classroom each day?

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3.  Build Community - Every teacher knows the feeling of those first staff meetings coming off of summer break, and any great administrator knows it would be a terrible move to start off that staff meeting going over the school improvement plan. Provide your students an enjoyable activity to remind them that building relationships with their peers is important and enjoyable. Your students will thank you for giving them one day to ease into the swing of things before jumping into your lesson on the "Causes of the Great Depression" or "Newton's Three Laws of Motion". Here is an activity you can use with your students to get them up and moving and interacting with their peers. If you have done this activity before, it never hurts to do it again. Simply encourage them to find a new partner to conduct the activity with.

Enjoy this first week back and remember that for some of your students the one consistent safe and positive place in their life is your classroom. As tough as it is coming back from break for most of us, the impact you make on a daily basis is unmatched by most professions. Thank you for what you do each day for kids. Let’s make 2018 a great year that focuses on supporting the whole child!

About the Author: Lindsay Norlin was a Social Studies Teacher for ten years at Sumner High School where she taught U.S. History, Contemporary World, You and the Law and IB Psychology. She strongly believes developing character and supporting the Whole Child is key to a student's success as she saw first-hand the impact it had on her students. This year she began working for CharacterStrong in terms of helping coordinate trainings, support schools implementing the curriculum and provide CharacterStrong resources for teachers.